In history today, September 2, the first ATM, Japan surrenders and a tennis player wins on his birthday, according to history.com.

In 1945, Okinawa was captured in late June by Americans. In early August, U.S. President Harry Truman ordered a U.S. B-29 bomber to drop the atomic bomb on Hiroshima. The USSR declares war on Japan. By August 10, the Japanese emperor accepted peace and relayed that message to the U.S., which was accepted immediately. They held the ceremony to be sure Allies could be present.

Truman appointed U.S. Gen. Douglas MacArthur as Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers. Truman chose USS Missouri, named after his home state, as the place for the ceremony of the Japanese official surrender.

The decks of the Missouri had flags from U.S., Britain, USSR and China waving and was surrounded by more than 250 Allied warships in Tokyo Bay. The sun did shine after the 20-minute ceremony with signatures from Japanese Foreign Minister Shigemitsu, Gen. Umezu, MacArthur and representatives from 10 more countries.

In the Rockville Center in New York, the first ATM dispensed cash in 1969. Don Wetzel is credited with the modern ATM after waiting in line at the bank.

Because of criminals stealing PINs and setting up fake ATMs, the government passed legislation requiring banks to make it safer for customers with locked entryways and surveillance cameras in 1996.

At the U.S. Open in 1991, Jimmy Connors beats Aaron Krickstein, 24, in a fourth-round, fifth-set tie-breaker in less than five hours on his 39th birthday.

Connors retired in 1996 and was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1998 with eight singles major championships, five are U.S. Opens.

Also on this date:

  • The U.S. Treasury Department was founded in 1789, creating the country's first debt fueling capital for the revolution.
  • With the the 8.3 magnitude Great Kwanto Earthquake causing the Great Tokyo Fire in 1923, 143,000 people were killed.
  • Diana Nyad swam from Cuba to Florida in 2013 at age 64 and completed the 110-mile swim in 53 hours without shark cage protection.
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